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Brent’s Blog

Weld Wire Receives 2016 Best of King of Prussia Award

December 14, 2016

http://kingofprussia.kingofprussia.myawardcenter.org/PressReleaseub.aspx?cc=DHC-3SUT-PHDD

 

Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Weld Wire Receives 2016 Best of King of Prussia Award

King of Prussia Award Program Honors the Achievement

KING OF PRUSSIA December 7, 2016 — Weld Wire has been selected for the 2016 Best of King of Prussia Award in the Welding Supplies category by the King of Prussia Award Program.

Each year, the King of Prussia Award Program identifies companies that we believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and our community. These exceptional companies help make the King of Prussia area a great place to live, work and play.

Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2016 King of Prussia Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the King of Prussia Award Program and data provided by third parties.

About King of Prussia Award Program

The King of Prussia Award Program is an annual awards program honoring the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the King of Prussia area. Recognition is given to those companies that have shown the ability to use their best practices and implemented programs to generate competitive advantages and long-term value.

The King of Prussia Award Program was established to recognize the best of local businesses in our community. Our organization works exclusively with local business owners, trade groups, professional associations and other business advertising and marketing groups. Our mission is to recognize the small business community’s contributions to the U.S. economy.

SOURCE: King of Prussia Award Program

CONTACT:
King of Prussia Award Program
Email: PublicRelations@myawardcenter.org
URL: http://www.myawardcenter.org

 

Change is Good

June 28, 2016

By Julia Saul

Change — something that many fear but something that many times brings forth new opportunity and advancement. Weld Wire Company Inc. has been providing costumers with quality welding supplies for over 65 years.  The secret? CHANGE.  The company has morphed and expanded over the years in order to continue its’ success and progress.  Alan and Jeff Saul, part owners of Weld Wire, expressed their love for the company and excitement for its future with the changes put forth.  As Jeff explained it, “the company has naturally moved toward change with the new taking over for the old.” That being said, the company has undergone a large transformation. Brent Saul, part owner of Weld Wire, has made it his mission to move the company’s progress forward.  While the goal of the company has always been to create a positive atmosphere and a comfortable place to work, Brent wanted to take it a step farther and create a family environment for everyone in the company.  It seems that Brent truly succeeded in this pursuit as each and every member of the Weld Wire family acknowledged that Weld Wire is their home away from home and extended family.  Both Joanna and Melissa A, employees of the company, explained that with the love and support of the team at Weld Wire, they have been given incredible opportunity and have been changed in many ways. All of the employees also stressed that the company has become team oriented rather than competition oriented.  Melissa Y, an employee of Weld Wire for 13 years, expressed the team feel and said that “the employees have changed a lot and the group that we have now works together impeccably. We work together like a team and family.” Happy employees bring outstanding performance, therefore, the members of the family at Weld Wire come to work each and every day ready to achieve.  Jessica, a newer addition to the team, emphasized that she wakes up in mornings ready to work as hard as possible because she is not just doing a job at Weld Wire but is working for her team and is, in turn, helping herself as well as her co-workers succeed. Additionally, the transformation of Weld Wire included remodeling of the office building.  New floors, conference tables, bathrooms, and more have improved the atmosphere of Weld Wire and suits the company’s professionalism. Sue and Michelle, mother and daughter and long time employees of the company, expressed that the new and improved appearance of the office has created a much better working environment.
What is truly unbelievable is that, overall, each and every member of the “family” seemed to say the same thing — Weld Wire works as a team and family in order to strive to be the best company possible.  Hearing the same words over and over again from multiple different people exemplifies the honorable, loving nature of Weld Wire.  As John, another employee, expressed “at Weld Wire we are all family and are all vested into each other’s success.”  How amazing to have a company in which every employee enjoys going to work each day.

Weld Wire a Family Affair

April 22, 2016

IT’S A “FAMILY AFFAIR”
AT WELD WIRE COMPANY

By Wendy Bender

 

My mother is in the travel industry, which always seemed to me an interesting, fun and exciting vocation. I loved the idea of helping clients plan honeymoons, trips to Europe, African safaris, or trips to Asia. Of course, if you’re going to be selling it, you have to know it. Therefore, there is travel involved; sometimes to ancient cities and/or exotic tropical locales. I have always loved history, studying maps and going on trips. Who doesn’t? At the time, this sounded to me like a dream job. Since she was a top agent in the country, I figured, “who better to learn from than my own mother”? However, when I was in my early 20’s (a long time ago) and job-hunting, I asked a couple of times if she would consider training and hiring me. Her response was consistently, “absolutely not, we would KILL each other!”
Weld Wire Company is a 3rd generation, family owned business with three principals; two of which are brothers, Jeff Saul and Alan Saul, and the third principal, Brent Saul, is the son of Alan Saul. In the three years I’ve worked at Weld Wire Company, I’ve never heard a voice raised, let alone seen or heard anybody killing each other. I only see love, honor, kindness and respect. In addition to the Saul family, we have other families working together at Weld Wire Company; a mother and daughter, as well as a grandfather and grandson. To us, we are all “family” at Weld Wire Company. Some are blood relations and some of us are connected by history; personal and work. We look out for each other and I thoroughly believe that we are as strong as we are because of our deep (and deepening) connections with each other. Family gives us strength, support and a sense of security. It gives us a sense of belonging and identity. I was curious and wanted to know how our team felt about working with their family members. The responses were extremely positive. Alan Saul shared with me, “My brother Jeff and I have become closer since we have worked together (26 years), and working with my son Brent helped me in my growth as a person, and it has been a wonderful experience. I love working with my family.” I asked Alan what he found to be challenging when it came to working with family. He told me, “The most challenging thing is working for the good of our family above the good of our company…we have managed to survive by loving each other more than our business.” The mother and daughter on our team are Susan Harmelin, who is in charge of Accounts Receivable, and Michelle Cucinotta, our Controller. I have only witnessed love and laughter between them (and certainly no murderous rampages). Michelle said, ”I enjoy getting to see my mom every day; our relationship remains strong”. When asked what she finds challenging with regard to working with family, she explained, “sometimes it’s challenging to keep family business out of the work environment.” In the warehouse, Ed Hack, and Dalton Hack are grandfather and grandson. Dalton shared, “My aunt, uncle, cousin, sister, mom and dad have all worked in the warehouse at some point. They would help out on a short term basis when there were large orders that had to get done.” He added, “working with my grandfather hasn’t really changed our relationship, but working together at Weld Wire Company has given us a chance to see each other more frequently. I enjoy the fact that there’s a certain comfort level you get while working with family members.” While doing some researching and reading about family members in the workplace, I came across what I felt was excellent advice for family members working together.

BungoBox CEO Tom Cannon, who co-founded BungoBox with his cousin, wrote and submitted an article on avoiding family discord in the workplace to Upstart Business Journal titled How to work with family members (and not go completely crazy) . The following advice is an excerpt from Tom Cannon’s article: “Set your roles : Don’t assume anything. Instead, define your job descriptions and resist the urge to micromanage. Sit down and actually write out job responsibilities for each family member. This will help ensure that all business-critical functions are accounted for and each member is happy with his or her assigned duties. Go into as much detail as possible. For example, include what constitutes acceptable and unacceptable conduct. This is something you can always refer back to as a way to keep you on track. If have disagreements at this point then perhaps working together is not the best idea.
Spend time apart: Be sure to develop your own hobbies outside of work. It’s healthy to have time away from each other. Maintain your individuality; consider driving to work separately, taking different lunch appointments and sitting in separate offices.
Compartmentalize: After work hours, stop talking about office issues and go back to being family members. During work hours, though, remember that what happens at home shouldn’t carry over to work. Create some clear boundaries so you can separate the personal things from work life. From the get-go, it’s very helpful to decide not to chat about work issues during family gatherings. It can be hard to do, but it will become more natural with time.
Cheer-lead: Remember to encourage your family members. A quick compliment can go a long way and helps keep everyone energized. Building each other up is crucial. Likewise, a negative comment can have even more detrimental impact than you realize.
Get on the same page: Be sure to define your goals early on so everyone is working toward the same things. Naturally, you will each have your own ideas about how to get to the end goal, so there will be clashes. But if you define your top priorities, there is a common purpose. Remember: at the end of the day, you are stronger collectively than individually.
Seek outside advice: Consider bringing in an external consultant once a quarter. Bringing in an unbiased person is a great way to get issues on the table and to gain a fresh perspective. Instead of dealing directly with your family member, the consultant can do so. It’s not always easy to tell your brother-in-law that he’s not cutting it. Oftentimes, it is easier to take direction from a third party.
Last but not least, communicate: Of course, communication is the most important thing to keep in mind. With family, however, this may be easier said than done. Sometimes you know your family members so well that you assume they know exactly how you are feeling. But that is definitely not the case. It’s best to let go of that idea and communicate as you would with any non-family member. Good communication results from actively listening and giving effective feedback consistently.”
I can appreciate Tom Cannon’s advice and I am not certain whether my mother and I would have “killed” each other or not, even if we had read Cannon’s article 25 years ago. Based on the fact that we are on each others nerves after a couple of hours together, she was probably right. Mother does know best!
On another note, we are so excited as we look to the future!! Great things “start with a spark”, and sparks are literally flying at Weld Wire Company! We are determined to have a powerful and positive impact on the welding industry and the future generation of welders. Stay tuned!
I’d also like to give a huge SHOUT OUT to our amazing, hard-working and dependable Warehouse Team. We are so grateful to all of you and appreciate everything that you do on a daily basis. Thank you for doing such an amazing job cutting, spooling, loading and unloading, managing Inventory, and most of all, getting Orders filled and shipped with such care and lightning speed. We salute you! And to our customers that we view as an extension of our family, we are here for you always. We appreciate your support and loyalty. Our “Weld Wire Family” will always do everything in our power to help your companies thrive and succeed in good times as well as in challenging ones.
Thank you, Brent, for allowing me to share my thoughts in your Blog space.
WELDER UP!!!

Welding is a part of our everyday lives

June 26, 2015

By Julia Saul

When I was asked to sit down and write a blog for the Weld Wire Co. Inc website that discussed the importance of welding in the world and in the lives of myself and the other employees at Weld Wire, I truly had no idea what I was going to say.  Being a Saul, of course, I have always been aware of the steel industry and the major role it has played in my family’s life.  To me, the steel industry was important in a financial aspect for my family, however, I had never understood how welding affects my daily life and the daily lives of others.  This question sparked an interest in me and I began to research to understand the purpose of our company, Weld Wire, and why selling welding material is so important to the world.  I am always looking to find a purpose when performing a task or job.  In doing so, it always gives me the push to strive for the best.  As my father, Brent Saul, always says, “You need to be the best at what you do, no matter what it is you are doing.”  In order to live by his words, I needed to find the purpose behind selling steel and what welding does to benefit the lives of myself and others.  I believe I have found my answer.  The best part of what I have found is that there are so many answers to this question.  As you will read, many of the employees here at Weld Wire find a different reason for the importance of welding in their own personal lives.

What is welding, you may ask.  In simple terms, welding is a process that joins two metals together permanently (welding information center).  Welding is a part of our everyday lives.   From the kitchen appliances we use each day, the buildings we live in, to the cars we drive.  Most of what we use is welded or made with equipment that has been welded (welding information center).  Without welding, our lives would be completely different and frankly, quit boring.  Getting to another country would be impossible seeing as airplanes, large ships and other means of transportation would be nonexistent.  Imagine a world where we could not just hop in the car and run to the grocery store for the missing ingredient in a recipe.  What about a world in which some of the most well-known sculptures and works of art weren’t around?  Without welding, works of art such as the Arch in St. Louis would not have been created (welding information center).  Sites such as the arch are major aspects of the world and are what make each country unique.  Ultimately, it has become clear to me that the world truly would not be the same without welding, yet, most people do not even give it a thought.  When looking at the steel business in this light, my whole perspective has changed.  I now understand why it has been so important to my family and that the work done at Weld Wire and within the steel industry as a whole is immensely important.

I looked to the other employees at Weld Wire for their thoughts on Welding and how they believe it impacts their everyday lives as well as the lives of people all around the world.  Here are some of their thoughts on the topic:

“Welding is used in almost all manufacturing of Metal products. Without welding, our lives would not be as interesting.   We wouldn’t have airplanes, trains, space shuttles or most buildings.  Additionally, welding provides high paying jobs.” – Alan Saul

“I believe welding is important to the world because it is both a cyclical and counter cyclical industry. With welding we build new and repair old. This provides jobs in both up and down economies. Welding is also important because of how it makes everyday life easier. Most people don’t realize, at least when I talk to them, how much welding they benefit from.  To name a few, Cars, bridges, buildings, technology, healthcare.” – Jared Herschend

“Due to welding I receive a paycheck that helps pay my bills as well as the luxuries in life such as a cruise.  Welding also plays a large role in the creation of cruise ships.” – Joanna Gleba

“If I was going to say why welding is important, I would say that is has given me purpose in life. Not only do we work together on initiatives to help promote the welding industry among the youth of our country and work with colleges, we offer value in what we do. We aren’t just another company and being a part of THAT in the welding industry makes welding important to me. I challenge myself when I’m driving to look around and see what is welded, so many trailers, cars, buildings, bridges and exercise equipment….all welded! I love that! I love being a part of this team and having a career that can be as big as we make it!” – Jessica Noll

“Welding is essential in many aspects of our everyday lives: infrastructure, economy, military, aerospace and artists use it to express themselves.” – Melissa Yashura

“Welding is important to the world because it helps us cross large and small bodies of water. It’s important in my life because it keeps family traditions going. My family is big on fishing, crabbing, and canoeing. Without welding, we wouldn’t have the proper boat/canoe to do those activities. We wouldn’t have the equipment to grill a nice juicy burger either!” – Melissa Alimonti

“Welding has been my life for 51 years. I was 18 when I started here.  I will continue to work in the warehouse as long as I can do the work.  Welding has helped the country move forward.” – Ed Hack

“Weld wire pays my bills.  Welding keeps my car together and is part of so many different things in the world.  Welding does so much for everyone.” – Harry Donahue (Reds)

“Welding is a part of everything around us. Without welding we wouldn’t be able to do the things we do.” – Dalton

 Welding is a part of our everyday lives.

Brent and Julia Saul

Brent and Julia

 

 

First Weld Wire “Spark” Award Winner!

February 16, 2015

Congratulations to Chrissy Heizer, 17, Winner of the First Weld Wire “Spark” Award!

by Brent Saul

Chrissy posing with her gear and awards

Chrissy posing with her gear and awards

Chrissy in action

Chrissy in action

Chrissy and instructor Chris King

Chrissy and instructor Chris King

“I wanted a challenge. I wanted to prove to myself and others that I can not only survive in the welding industry but be successful. I chose welding because I know several of my guy friends had taken the class so I thought I would give it a try. It turns out that I fell in love with it and want to take it as far as my talent, passion, and opportunity will allow!” — Chrissy Heizer, 17, welding student and first winner of the Weld Wire Spark Award

In one way or another, I’ve been a coach my entire adult life. My early passion for playing sports put me in contact with coaches who helped make me the person I am today. They pushed me, challenged me, taught me, and most of all – they believed in me. That’s something I try to pay forward every day. In coaching my kids’ sports teams, I’ve seen firsthand what the right kind of encouragement can do for a young person. It can truly change everything.

At Weld Wire, we’re dedicated to finding and fueling those sparks in the welding field. That’s why we’ve started giving “Spark” Awards to young people just entering the industry who have the potential and dedication to make a great career in welding.

In November, we sponsored The 2014 Central Kentucky Welding Classic, a welding contest where some of the best student welders in the state compete for scholarships and other prizes. The contest, nearly a decade old, is hosted by Chris King, an instructor at the Hughes Jones Harrodsburg Area Technology Center and this year attracted students from 17 different schools. Weld Wire donated Duramax electrodes and MIG wire to the competitors, along with a prize of a $200 scholarship towards welding school costs.

Competition was fierce, but at the end of the day, we awarded Chrissy Lynne Heizer, a 17-year-old high school student from Harrodsburg, Kentucky, the Spark award. She placed 4th in the overall competition, but what really impressed me was her tenacity, her fearlessness as a young woman entering a male-dominated industry, and the words of her instructor and coach, Chris King: “Chrissy has come a long way and overcome some bad situations. She has great potential and a determination very rare in teens. I haven’t seen anyone like her in 15 years in the industry or 10 years of teaching.”

Chrissy is a remarkable young woman, and we are thrilled to be able to support and coach her as she pursues her dreams.

From me and the entire Weld Wire family: congratulations, Chrissy! We can’t wait to see what you’ll achieve next!

 

“It Starts With A Spark”

December 12, 2014

I sell filler metals for welding; yet I have never welded in my life, nor have I actually watched a welder performing the art in person.  The closest I had ever been to welding was watching Jennifer Beals on the big screen circa 1983 in Flashdance.  Therefore, I was beyond excited to finally have an opportunity to experience, first hand, a team of welders running the material that I delivered personally in order for them to qualify our product.  All I can say, is “WOW!!!!”.

Before arriving, I was not certain if the testing would be done on the day I was delivering, or on another day, when they weren’t so busy.  But to my surprise, they were all set up for the process and invited me to stay; I was thrilled.

Once the team finished adjusting the settings to ensure performance capability, each welder was given the chance to work with and run the material.  When the head welder stepped up to do his thing, I wasn’t quite sure of what to expect; however, in my mind I imagined a bead; a simple bead running down the middle of the block, in a straight line, joining the two metal plates.

What a rush when the sparks started flying!  After a couple of minutes, when the welder took a step back to gain a different perspective, everybody else seemed to lean in to get a closer look at the weld (and of course, I leaned in to).  What I saw, and what was created, completely shocked and amazed me.  The result was a shiny perfect metal weave; which in a way reminded me of the braid I make in my daughter’s ponytail each morning.  It was gorgeous; a work of art.  I was in awe.

For so long my mind had focused on the strength of the weld as opposed to the beauty of the weld.  Since my experience, I find myself inspecting visible welds wherever I go, and recently asked my colleagues about their “first times”.

“I started in this industry in 2009 as a Purchasing Agent at a nuclear manufacturing company”, our Account Manager, Jessica Noll explained.  “I remember one day going through all of the purchase requests that the guys in the shop were sending me.  There were thousands of contact tips, grinding wheels, and all of this wire!  I thought to myself, ‘how the heck are they using so many contact tips and what are these things?’  I put on my pink hard hat, went out to the shop, and was determined to find out what they were used for.  As I walked around, I remember feeling so intrigued by all the different welding processes I saw. On my way to morning meetings in the shop, I would watch them MIG, TIG and stick weld, operate the cutting tables, watch the waterjet machine cut parts out with garnet; I simply fell in love with this industry.  I research different welding applications, and keep up-to-date on new technology because I just love learning about it.  I have welded only to become familiar with the different processes (and because I just couldn’t not weld in my lifetime)!  I prefer TIG over MIG and stick. I remember when I was stick welding that I felt like I was getting ‘electrocuted’, and I said I would never do that again!  I’ve often thought to myself that I would love to have a little hobby welding machine so that I can make some different things in my garage. I will forever love this industry and I encourage women to explore it!  The technology and the precision that it requires is just so fascinating, and they actually say that women make EXCELLENT TIG WELDERS.  I guess you can say…it all started with a spark!”

Our VP of Sales, Brent Saul experienced welding first hand at an Esab training seminar, “We welded stainless and steel alloys in TIG, MIG, and stick. I loved the feeling of welding although the amount of gear I had on to protect me was like wearing the heaviest winter ski clothes.  The welding helmet makes everything so dark, and in order to see what I was working on, I had to ‘strike an arc’.  I have watched welding in many facilities for production, job shops, in the field and in a back yard.  Welding is such a cool field, and one to get very excited about.  I love every aspect of it, from artists to production shops; they all vary and each is unique.”

Yes, welding is super COOL, and I am happy to report that the weld team I referred to that tested my hand-delivered E71T-1C/-1M was ecstatic about our wire!  And we here at Weld Wire Company are ecstatic about the future of this critical and awesome Industry!   Thank you for reading.

Wendy

Weld Wire Company is extremely proud to support Big Brothers Big Sisters

October 17, 2014

Weld Wire Company is extremely proud to support Big Brothers Big Sisters, an organization whose mission is to “provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring professionally supported one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better, forever.”   Big Brothers, Big Sisters’ commitment to changing how children grow up in America is very much like Weld Wire Company’s aspiration to inspire lives. We believe strongly in advocating for children, as they are our leaders of tomorrow. Having a support system via a “Big” can positively impact a child for life. Every young person deserves to know they have someone to look up to; someone who supports them and appreciates them.  A “Big” can help a child facing adversity believe that their present situation doesn’t have to be their future.

Some of us at Weld Wire Company have witnessed or experienced firsthand the positive impact BBBS and Mentoring has on “Littles” and “Bigs” alike.  Recently, Weld Wire Company was a proud Sponsor of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Pittsburgh’s Night at the Byham, where Off the Record, a musical comedy spoof of Pittsburgh’s news and newsmakers was performed.  Jessica Noll, an Account Manager at Weld Wire Company attended the BBBS Night at the Byham.  “This cause is so important to me because of the struggles I faced growing up.  My mother was extremely abusive and relied on me to raise my four brothers and one sister.  I was a little older than my nine year old daughter is now when I was changing diapers, feeding twin boys, putting them down for naps, bathing them, cleaning, folding laundry, plus taking care of a two year old toddler and a brother and sister who were closer to my age.  Being the oldest for me was very difficult.  There was an extreme amount of responsibility, with no guidance, and a terrible feeling every day wondering when the next time our mom was going to flip out, or hit someone.  When I finally moved to live with my Aunt Lisa, I finally felt safe and had someone to motivate me and guide me on the right path, she has been my rock; in a way she was my big sister.  That is why (BBBS) is so important to me, even though this organization did not support me directly.  Everyone needs a positive role model to help them realize their full potential.”

Since early childhood, brothers Jeff Saul, and Alan Saul, Weld Wire Company’s President and Vice President have had personal ties to the Big Brothers Big Sisters organization.  Jeff explained, “As a child growing up, I saw my father very active in being a Big Brother.

It meant so much to him to help provide family, love, and guidance to those that were in need.  My father was from a broken family due to early deaths of his parents and he endured so many traumas in orphanages and foster homes. I went to a Big Brothers camp at the age of nine and met many kids much less fortunate than myself.  I know the importance of family values, as well as the security of having a mom and dad, along with two brothers.  The Big Brothers program is a fantastic organization that is so worthwhile to support.”

Alan Saul describes his dad as “a person who would give a stranger the shirt off his back.”  He added, “my father was an orphan and he always tried to help the underdog; he always taught us to stand up for those that were being picked on…my father was my idol; he was the best man I ever knew.  I went to the Wyomissing Big Brothers camp, and also enjoyed going to the Center City Philadelphia Big Brothers to play with other children.  He was a Big Brother until he got sick.”

Weld Wire Company is dedicated to inspiring the youth of today.   For more information about supporting Big Brothers Big Sisters, click on the following link www.bbbs.org.

In memory of Kenny Bryan

May 29, 2014

Today, I take a moment to speak for all of us at Weld Wire to pay tribute to and celebrate the life of Gerald “Kenny” Bryan. Kenny was not just one of the finest men in the industry, but we were also honored to count him as a friend and part of our Weld Wire family. For many years, we had the privilege of working with him and always counted on his intelligence, his insight and his unfailing integrity.

Kenny helped us to shape our purpose, which is to rebuild and reinvigorate the welding field and to attract and train the best young men and women to join it. He inspired us with the example he set in his life and work. Kenny believed in the value of hard work, and he relentlessly championed the true value of quality control, alloy identity and safety.

In Kenny’s honor, we are working on a new initiative: to guide young people toward a fulfilling and rewarding career in welding, at the same time helping to fill the gaps in our welding workforce. With Kenny’s memory as our guide, we are working to help to make a real difference in the lives of young adults and in the industry as a whole.  

We miss you, Kenny, and we thank you so much for lighting the way with your friendship, your dedication, your hard work and your integrity.

“Giving Back” – Cradles to Crayons

December 11, 2013

Helping those in need and supporting our community is our way of “giving back”. We here at Weld Wire Company feel that we have a responsibility to those in need and to those less fortunate. We hope with all of our hearts to make a difference and do our part to make the world a better place.

Weld Wire Company has had the pleasure this year of working with and supporting Cradles To Crayons. Cradles to Crayons is a non-profit organization that provides homeless and low-income children living in the Boston and Philadelphia regions, with the essentials needed for them to feel “safe, warm, and ready to learn.”  If you would like to help or learn more about the program, please visit them at  www.cradlestocrayons.org.

In the spirit of the season, The Weld Wire Company Family wants to wish all of our friends, families, customers and suppliers a very safe and happy holiday season. In addition, we wish you all a healthy, happy and prosperous 2014!

 

 

Inspiring a Future Generation

September 9, 2013

Although this is Brent’s Blog and I am very new to the World of Welding, I wanted to share that I am learning so much on a daily basis and finding myself utterly fascinated by this trade…this “art” that I knew nothing of in my previous life.  We at Weld Wire Company simply supply a component of what the artist needs, the filler metals; however, there are questions asked of us daily by our customers that lead us to believe that we could possibly provide even more.  Some of these questions have left us scratching our heads wondering why so many of our customers are having difficulty finding dependable, qualified welders.  Although some have shared that they can indeed find a welder; but that they cannot keep a welder, or the welder that they do find, does not share the same work ethic as the “old-timers”.

Welding is such an essential trade and so integral to the growth and management of our world and our infrastructure; the bridges we desperately need built and repaired…the strong pipelines to transport oil and gas, the tools that make our lives and occupations safer and easier.  The question arises, why isn’t the younger generation encouraged and exposed to welding?  Why are they not looking into this trade earlier, this trade that’s so intrinsic to society?  One could ask themselves if it may be society’s pressure.  We are programmed that if we are going to be “successful” we must go directly to a four-year college, or university, and this is the road that must be travelled, if we are to achieve this “success”.    In many cases, society measures this success by how much money we make, and we do indeed need money to eat, keep a roof over our heads and support our families.  On www.indeed.com, pipe welders are sharing their pay rates to be anywhere between $24.00/hour to $110.00/hour while a foreman with a natural gas company in Arizona remarked that, with a recent raise, he will break $110,000 this year.

We at Weld Wire Company are going to be exploring these questions, digging deeper into the Welding Arena, and looking into ways that we can do our part in nurturing this extremely necessary trade in the months ahead.  If anybody reading this Blog has suggestions as to how we could do more to advocate and encourage this important field, we are always here and open to ideas.

In addition, I would like to thank Brent Saul for allowing me to share my thoughts in his Blog space, and I hope to have the chance again in the future.  Please stay tuned!

-Wendy Bender

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